Michigan shuts down bad schools. Leading states build them up.

Michigan shuts down bad schools. Leading states build them up.

Date
Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Excerpt from the Bridge magazine article by Chastity Pratt Dawsey:

The announcement in January that Michigan will enforce its school accountability law by shutting down the state’s lowest-performing schools set off a flurry of protests. Thirty-eight public schools—25 in Detroit—enrolling more than 12,000 students face possible closure by June 30, though the final number will likely be far fewer.

Researchers across the country say Michigan’s school accountability law is in a class all its own. They note that no other state requires the closure each year of its lowest-performing public schools. To the contrary, higher-performing states focus instead on first trying to take concrete steps to improve failing schools by replacing school leaders or adopting other strong measures.  

...

The major difference between Michigan’s accountability process and the procedures in more successful states is that Michigan’s education landscape is highly politicized and divided over the best way to reform schools, experts who have studied policies here have said. Most agree that school closures should occur with public input and only after the state implements other reforms to ensure students go to a better school.

“The bottom line is you have to address the scarcity, the lack of high-performing schools. If you’re not going to do that then (students) are just stuck,”  said Robin Lake, executive director for the Center or Reinventing Public Education in Washington which studied Detroit school reforms.

“The state should absolutely be involved in making sure there’s a better option,” Lake said, “but the worst-case scenario is there’s no other option so you do nothing. There has to be someone thinking about increasing the number of quality schools and addressing the quality desert.”

...

Read the full article.

 

District
Commentary
testimonial
Contact Us
crpe@uw.edu
206.685.2214
425 Pontius Ave N, Ste 410
Seattle, WA 98109
Connect