Julian Betts

Professor, Dept. of Economics, University of California, San Diego

http://economics.ucsd.edu/about/Profile.aspx?pid=25

Julian R. Betts is professor and former chair of economics at the University of California, San Diego, where he is Executive Director of the San Diego Education Research Alliance (sandera.ucsd.edu). He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and an adjunct fellow and a Bren fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.

Dr. Betts has written extensively on the link between student outcomes and measures of school spending, and he has studied the role that school choice, educational standards, accountability, and teacher qualifications play in student achievement. He has served on three National Academy of Sciences panels, the Consensus Panel of the National Charter School Research Project, and various advisory groups for the U.S. Department of Education. He is also principal investigator for the federally mandated National Evaluation of Magnet Schools.

He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada and an M.Phil. degree in Economics from Oxford University

12/2008
Ch. 1 - Charter Schools and Student Achievement: A Review of the Evidence (HFR '08)

This paper analyzes existing charter outcome studies and finds that there is great variety in charter school performance, with charters outperforming in some grade spans/subjects and underperforming in others...

12/2006
Ch. 4 - Improving State and Local Assessments of Charter School Performance (HFR '06)

This chapter of Hopes, Fears, & Reality: A Balanced Look at American Charter Schools in 2006 shows how states can get an honest picture of how charter schools are performing under their...

05/2006
Key Issues in Studying Charter Schools and Achievement: A Review and Suggestions for National Guidelines

This white paper from the Charter School Achievement Consensus Panel examines the existing research on student achievement in charter schools and details how future research could...